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James Bond stuntman from London Olympics killed in Alps jump

James Bond stuntman from London Olympics killed in Alps jump

The stuntman who parachuted into the opening ceremony of the 2012 London Olympics was killed in a wing-diving accident. Photo: Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) – A stuntman who parachuted into the opening ceremony of the 2012 London Olympics dressed as the fictional British spy James Bond alongside a double of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has been killed in a wing-diving accident in the Swiss Alps.

Mark Sutton, 42, a former Ghurkha Rifles officer, died after jumping from a helicopter and crashing into a mountain ridge in the Trient area near the border with France on Wednesday.

Swiss police are investigating.

Wing-diving is an extreme sport which involves using a special jumpsuit with wings that allow the wearer to glide. Wing-divers usually end their jump using a parachute.

The Olympic stunt was a highlight of the last year’s opening ceremony and followed the showing of a film in which 007 actor, Daniel Craig, called at Buckingham Palace to meet and escort the real Queen Elizabeth to the Olympic stadium.

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